kyodo

This tag is associated with 6 posts

Residents of evacuation zone in Kawauchi to stay home overnight, global post/kyodo, 3/23/14

The Japanese government is considering allowing residents of an evacuation zone located within a 20-kilometer radius of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant to stay at their homes overnight for three months from April 26, government sources said Sunday.

As of the end of December, 330 residents of 152 households in the zone of Kawauchi village, Fukushima Prefecture, were still in evacuation housing after the nuclear plant was severely damaged by the huge earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011.

They are currently allowed to stay in the evacuation zone only in the daytime.

The latest plan has become more likely as decontamination works in the living spaces within the evacuation zone are almost complete, according to the sources.

The government will soon propose it to the municipal authority and the residents while examining the possibility of lifting the evacuation order for the area, although cautious voices still remain that the radiation level may still be high.

As for an area of the city of Tamura, adjacent to Kawauchi, the government has allowed its residents since last August to stay there day or night and, as of April 1, will make it the first area within the 20-km radius to have its evacuation order lifted.

==Kyodo

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Tablet PCs connect nuclear crisis evacuees of Fukushima village, kyodo, 8/8/12

A communications system went into full operation Wednesday involving the use of about 2,500 tablet personal computers to connect people who had to evacuate their village as result of the Fukushima nuclear crisis.

Some 6,100 residents of Iitate who have been living in different locations since the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster can now talk face-to-face online and receive news and videos of their hometown via their tablet PCs.

Among accident-affected municipalities, Iitate village is the first to utilize tablet devices, allocated to all its households, to help residents keep in touch, said the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications.

First disaster law tweak since Hanshin quake eyed, kyodo/japan times, 5/1/12

The government plans to revise the disaster countermeasures law to allow aid provisions to be sent more swiftly to shattered areas by eliminating the need to wait for a formal request from their local governments.

A bill is in the works to allow the central and prefectural governments to decide unilaterally whether to ship supplies to disaster-hit areas when municipal authorities can’t go through official channels because of heavy damage, sources said.
It would be the first major revision to the law since the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake.
The Cabinet is expected to approve the bill as early as May 11, and submit it to the Diet, the sources said.
A decision to revise the law was made in light of the destruction caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake, which literally wiped out local government offices in many towns and cities in Tohoku last March and knocked out communications, they said.
The revision would also set new regulations to facilitate the acceptance of evacuees by other municipalities, allowing prefectures and the central government to organize mass transfers involving multiple communities more smoothly, the sources said.

Tsunami-hit hospital rebuilt with Swiss funds makes fresh start, kyodo, 4/15/12

By Maya Kaneko

ONAGAWA, Japan, April 15, Kyodo

A hospital with a nursing home for the elderly that was severely damaged by the devastating earthquake and tsunami on March 11 last year in Onagawa, Miyagi Prefecture made a fresh start Sunday, with the facility rebuilt with donations from Switzerland.

The only medical institution in the coastal town of about 8,300 people was refurbished at a cost of some 1.9 billion yen shouldered by the Swiss Red Cross. The first floor of the four-story building on a hill 16 meters above sea level was destroyed by tidal waves that reached 1.95 meters above the hospital’s ground level.

The Onagawa Community Medical Center now has 19 beds for patients and 100 beds for the elderly residing in the nursing home section. The hospital, which was run by the town government at the time of the disaster, was privatized last October.

Tsunami-hit hospital rebuilt with Swiss funds makes fresh start, kyodo, 4/15/12

By Maya Kaneko
ONAGAWA, Japan, April 15, Kyodo

A hospital with a nursing home for the elderly that was severely damaged by the devastating earthquake and tsunami on March 11 last year in Onagawa, Miyagi Prefecture made a fresh start Sunday, with the facility rebuilt with donations from Switzerland.

The only medical institution in the coastal town of about 8,300 people was refurbished at a cost of some 1.9 billion yen shouldered by the Swiss Red Cross. The first floor of the four-story building on a hill 16 meters above sea level was destroyed by tidal waves that reached 1.95 meters above the hospital’s ground level.

The Onagawa Community Medical Center now has 19 beds for patients and 100 beds for the elderly residing in the nursing home section. The hospital, which was run by the town government at the time of the disaster, was privatized last October.

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